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, and i mean-- i do not mean this to be in any way disrespectful toward religion-- but is it like a political convention? do you have people getting together feeling each other out? because one of you is going to be elected to this job. what's it like inside one of those conclaves? >> well, before the conclave actually start, there are a number of days when all the cardinals come together so that we can actually talk among ourselves, begin to get a better sense of one another. there are going to be 117 of us there with the right to vote. and just to get to know a little bit better personally one another, there will be four or five days of these meetings. but it-- >> schieffer: will you in any way-- could you be the nominee? >> no, that-- that enters into the world of fantasy. but when we get back into the real world i think what will happen is a number of cardinals will begin to surface in the conversation among all of us as particularly appealing candidates. it's not like a political process, though. there aren't nominations, and you don't have people saying, "i vote for..." and
's an election, consisting of the cardinals, the religion, will meet in rome to decide on a new pope. that will happen before the end of march. again, there had been reports in the past couple of months that his health had been failing, that he had difficulty reading text, and he had in the past suggested if popes had problem in office with their health, that, in fact, that they should step down. he followed his own message. in fact, he will be stepping down less than eight years into his papacy. to show how historic this is, guys, the last time this happened was 600 years ago. that happened to be pope gregory in the year 1415. we just heard a press conference from vatican officials in the past ten minutes or so and they looked surprised. they said they got this information this morning. so secrecy is the name of the game in the vatican. benedict is his name. he is a german. he was a strong conservative. they called him the enforcer in the church prior to becoming a pope. the pope's rotweiler, referring to a dog, that's how he was referred to as well. the choice of ratzinger as pope
growi ining in the third world, africa and asia, and it's becoming a different religion. it may become a religion even more than it was in the history of the religion of the poor. >> that's the root of the faith. >> but also a more conservative faith in many ways also. you've got another great story in here, the most expensive weapon ever built. and this is a great story for all those who are carping about how a few cuts in the defense department with the sequester is going to savage america's national defense structure. it just simply is not. this story is a great example of just how forward thinking ike was when he warned of the growing industrial military complex. it is described in this piece. >> right. and the irony, of course, is that the f-35, which will be the most expensive weapon system ever built, was conceived as a fighter for all three services. remember, each of the different services would have their own warplanes. but what has happened, it's become a kind of -- like a camel is is a horse designed by committee, it's a jet that has all kinds of different things that in ma
, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, that sort of thing. the fair labor standards act also requires that it be posted the minimum wage is $7.50 an hour, most people are aware of the laws. if i ask the average person, including students that come to my class, what are your rights under the national labor act, they don't have a clue. most don't know what a union is. workers have no idea what their rights are. one of the most controversial things the labor board has done finally they proposed a new rule that would require employers to post a notice, a large, one-page notice, that would define your basic rights thunder enational labor relations act just as we have for civil rights laws and the wage and hour laws. that's being challenge the one issue -- host: who is -- guest: employers are challenging that. the biggest publicity that's been generated didn't involve a board decision. they was boeing case, boeing decided to open a new manufacturing plant in south carolina. most of their work has historically been done in the seattle, washington, area and they've had a lot of work
campaigned. >> steve did all day. >> i'm the right age. >> call him now? >> and the right religion. >> 42 years. you know, what's interesting to me about this is you're right. you know, benedict is mr. inside and his election, first of all, there were so many reasons why it was sort of doubtful, he was an unlikely choice. likely but unlikely in 2005. election was made possible by rules change that pope john paul ii put in place in 1996 and took the old super jorkt with two thirds of the cardinals to agree an they have as many ballots it took and he said after 30 ballots, a mere 30 ballots, majority rule wins and when somebody gets a majority, end the process because the majority hangs on and then win and probably enabled benedict to win in 2005. almost unanimous and four ballots and that's it. he did away with the rules change and so we have reverted the two thirds majority and it's the only way that pope john paul ii would have become the pope. there was sort of two candidates duking it out and he was the compromise choice and the unlikely, nobody thought him, polish guy with a chance. a
in the rye." and, of course, there was poetry. i had more than one teacher whose religion was elliot's four quartets. and we learned attitude from yates and from the greek anthology. we wanted to come proud, open-eyed and laughing to the tomb. and i loved this epitaph of an ancient greek sailor. it's in a greek anthology translation by dudley fitz, wonderful teacher. tomorrow the wind will have fallen, tomorrow i will be safe in harbor, tomorrow, i said, and death spoke in that little word. o stranger, this is the nemesis of the spoken word, bite back the daring tongue that would say tomorrow. we marveled at keats' ability to imagine what it would feel like to be a billiard ball rolling across a smooth table. we hungered for lives that had the emotional range of shakespeare's sonnets. and if we were going to be saved, we knew it would be by literature. and it was the french historian jules membership lay who put it best for me as i tried in my mid 40s to turn to biography, to life writing. history, he said -- and you could think that he meant to include biography and fiction -- history, he
and spreading the religion and stuff, but primarily he was about spices. why spices? why were spices so valuable back then? it wasn't just that food was finish in europe at the time -- food was terrible in europe at the time before all these things in the new world, and it was, but all these spices, each new, exotic spice was thought to have certain properties. they might make you feel a bit more randy, how should i put this? each of these new spices were kind of the viagra of the day, right? so that's one of the reasons why this trade became so valuable, and people risked their lives to explore these things. so after the conquest and kohl in iization, the settlers made fortunes exporting drugs back to europe and consuming them within this hemisphere as well. and by drugs i mean sugar -- which many people consider a drug -- where we get rum from, definitely a drug, coffee, tobacco, tea, and, of course, these afrotease yak spices, right? and so these things became the developmental engine for hemispheric development. right? vast fortunes were created. think about, you know, where we are today, wa
. >> hi. i'm a freelance religion writer. one thing i noticed is what i call the fault equivalencey. they will put out someone usually from the right based on the fact they are a colorful character or interesting without any information about the voracity of their claims, the data site and so forth, and they are presenting an article on you youtube someone saying something inaccurate and unchallenged. i wonder moving forward what your thoughts are on that? >> you have to challenge both sides, yes. and ask questions and how it plays into the -- what i was saying earlier about having assessments in journalism and not just saying, you know, he said this, she said that, but actually saying, this is what they both said, here are some other data points and here is what could actually be the case. for some it would be key issues, but for others -- force >> i have a question where bradley mentioned about connecting people online. clearly today you talked about connecting people online in meaningful ways. i am curious if in your work on facebook you thought about connecting creative minded k
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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